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The Dawn of the Post-Deep Blue Era

  • Monty Newborn
Chapter

Abstract

With Deep Blue retired, the new monarch of the computer chess world was up for grabs. In 1995 and leading up to the first Deep Blue versus Kasparov match, the 8th World Computer Chess Championship (WCCC) was held in Hong Kong. IBM planned to use this event to showcase the new Deep Blue and to establish formal recognition of its position at the top of the computer chess world. Deep Blue’s earlier version called Deep Thought had won the 6th WCCC in 1989 in Edmonton, winning all five of its games and dominating the competition. Then in 1992, the Deep Blue team skipped participating in the 7th WCCC. The team preferred to dedicate itself to honing Deep Blue’s talents against human grandmasters while aiming for the ultimate target, Garry Kasparov.

Keywords

Final Round Search Depth World Champion Half Point Computer Chess 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Suggest Readings

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Other Reference

  1. Website of all WMCCC from 1980 through 2001: http://old.csvn.nl/wmcchist.html

Jeroen Noomen Discusses Rating Lists

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Computer ScienceMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada

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