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Assessing the reliability of system modules used in multiple life cycles

  • Muhammad Ilyas Mazhar
  • Muhammad Salman
  • Ian Howard

Abstract

This paper presents a reliability assessment model for maintenance and reliability engineers to determine the reusability potential of system modules based on their operating lives and, the pre-determined lifecycle of the parent product. In the first phase, the paper considers the time-to-failure of system modules to determine their overall operating life under normal operating conditions. Then, it determines the maximum number of lifecycles of the modules under consideration, which is a function of the modules’ total functional life and the product lifecycle. The functional potential of the modules is then discussed with reference to the probability of their failure. The study employs Weibull analysis for carrying out this analysis. The methodology was validated by using lifecycle data from a consumer product. The findings show that some of the components/modules of the product have a remarkable amount of residual life, which can be utilized by reusing these components in the next generation of the product. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and practicality of this multiple-use strategy. The study provides more perspectives to future research in the field of reliability, and decision-making on maintenance management and value recovery through multiple uses of system modules.

Keywords

System Module Electric Motor Residual Life Product Lifecycle Maintenance Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Muhammad Ilyas Mazhar
    • 1
  • Muhammad Salman
    • 1
  • Ian Howard
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringCurtin University of TechnologyPerthAustralia

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