Methods in Bone Biology in Animals: Biomechanics



The locomotor system has important mechanical functions that are concerned with the production, conduction, and modification of forces. This intimate relationship is seen in the adaptive changes of bones, muscles, tendons, and joints to increased or decreased mechanical solicitations. In bones, the relationship between structure and function is known as Wolff’s law, but the concept can be expanded to other components of the locomotor system.


Permanent Deformation Locomotor System Osseous Tissue Acrylic Cement Elastic Phase 


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© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Biomechanics, Medicine and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor SystemUniversity of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto School of MedicineRibeirão PretoBrazil

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