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Laser Clinical and Practice Pearls

  • Lori A. Brightman
  • Roy Geronemus
Chapter

Abstract

All laser operators should be up to date on associated laser risks and standard safety measures for each laser that they use.Different wavelengths of light are responsible for different ocular damage and therefore appropriate eyewear should be used with each laser treatment.

Keywords

Laser Treatment Laryngeal Mask Airway Tattoo Removal Dark Skin Type Fractional Photothermolysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Dermatology/Department of Plastic and Reconstructive SurgeryNew York Eye and Ear InfirmaryNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Laser and Skin Surgery Center of NYNew YorkUSA

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