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Abstraction

  • V. S. Alagar
  • K. Periyasamy
Part of the Texts in Computer Science book series (TCS)

Abstract

The concept of abstraction is imprecise. It cannot possibly be defined, but the notion of abstraction can be explained, illustrated, modeled, and understood. We begin this chapter by discussing different kinds of abstractions that have been proposed in mathematics and computer science. Next, we bring out the necessity of abstraction for software engineering and suggest different kinds of abstractions to learn for formalizing software development activities.

Keywords

Turing Machine Data Abstraction Software Development Process Abstract Machine Lambda Calculus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dept. Computer Science and Software Eng.Concordia UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Computer Science DepartmentUniversity of Wisconsin-La CrosseLa CrosseUSA

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