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Microsurgical Aspects of Face Transplantation

  • Steven Bernard
Chapter

Abstract

Performing a face transplant requires expertise in both facial reconstruction and microvascular technique. The best way to approach the microsurgical aspects of face transplantation is to break them into smaller parts. Defining microsurgery loosely as procedures typically done under a microscope, this chapter will describe the details dealing with the arteries, veins, and nerves of face transplantation from anatomy to the technical aspects.

Keywords

Facial Nerve Trigeminal Nerve External Jugular Vein Superficial Temporal Artery Facial Artery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer London 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Plastic SurgeryCleveland ClinicClevelandUSA

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