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Investigating the Role of Information on Service Strategies Using Discrete Event Simulation

  • Rachel Cuthbert
  • Ashutosh Tiwari
  • Peter D. Ball
  • Alan Thorne
  • Duncan McFarlane
Chapter
Part of the Decision Engineering book series (DECENGIN)

Abstract

This chapter details the work on a demonstration to illustrate the impact of information in the context of complex engineering services. The demonstration is achieved via a simulation model which illustrates factors, such as different service contracts, different levels of product condition information required by and available to the service provider, other constraints on the service system and different service performance levels achieved. The contribution of this work is showing, through simulating several scenarios, how support services may be improved as a result of providing better product condition information feedback to the service provider. In addition, the model factors in a number of other variables which have a significant impact on the level of the service provided. Results from the simulation models are presented, and a discussion of areas for further work is also provided. This discussion includes some suggested next steps and future information-related questions which the model may seek to answer.

Keywords

Lead Time Preventative Maintenance Discrete Event Simulation Spare Part Repair Time 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge Dr Gokula Annamalai Vasantha and Mr Kostis Gkekas from Cranfield Innovative Manufacturing Research Centre for their support in preparing Sect. 11.2 (Literature) of this chapter.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited  2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rachel Cuthbert
    • 1
  • Ashutosh Tiwari
    • 2
  • Peter D. Ball
    • 2
  • Alan Thorne
    • 1
  • Duncan McFarlane
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for ManufacturingUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  2. 2.Manufacturing DepartmentCranfield UniversityCranfieldUK

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