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Graphite Nanoplatelet Composites and Their Applications

  • H. T. Hahn
  • O. Choi
Conference paper

Abstract

Graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) are an attractive class of reinforcement materials as they offer both high modulus and high strength. GNPs have a thickness of <100 nm although their planar dimensions can be as large as a few micrometers. As with any other nanoscale particles, their effectiveness as a reinforcement phase depends on the surface functionalization, which controls dispersion and interfacial bonding. A simple surface oxidation using nitric acid is shown to yield as good an improvement in composite properties as a few other functional groups chemically bonded to the surface do. The properties discussed include modulus, strength, fracture toughness, adhesive strength, thermal and electrical conductivities, and dielectric constants. Methods of further exfoliating GNPs are discussed together with the associated benefits on composite properties. Potential applications of graphite nanoplatelet composites are presented to conclude the chapter.

Keywords

Amide Linkage Composite Strength Graphite Intercalation Compound Neat Resin Composite Modulus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This chapter is based on work supported by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant F9550-05-1-0138 with Dr. B. Les Lee as the Program Manager. Appreciation is extended to the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Systems Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology for an invited professorship, to Mr. Albert Tamashausky, Asbury Carbons for providing graphite nanoplatelets, and to Dr. Loon-Seng Tan, Air Force Research Laboratory for providing functionalized graphite nanoplatelets.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering DepartmentUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Materials Science and Engineering DepartmentCalifornia NanoSystems Institute, UCLALos AngelesUSA

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