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Abstract

In 1911 the British medical doctor Ronald Ross, who had already received the 1902 Nobel prize for his work on malaria, studied a system of differential equations modelling the spread of this disease. He showed that malaria can persist only if the number of mosquitoes is above a certain threshold. Therefore it is not necessary to kill all mosquitoes to eradicate malaria – it is enough to kill just a certain fraction. Similar epidemic models were later developed by Kermack and McKendrick.

Keywords

Nobel Prize Infected Human Transmission Probability Mosquito Population Indian Medical 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further reading

  1. 1.
    G.H.F.N.: Sir Ronald Ross, 1857–1932. Obit. Not. Fellows Roy. Soc. 1, 108–115 (1933) Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ross, R.: The Prevention of Malaria, 1st edn. John Murray, London (1910). www.archive.org Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ross, R.: The Prevention of Malaria, 2nd edn. John Murray, London (1911) Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ross, R.: Memoirs with a Full Account of the Great Malaria Problem and its Solution. John Murray, London (1923). www.archive.org Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Rowland, J.: The Mosquito Man, The Story of Sir Ronald Ross. Roy Publishers, New York (1958) Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.IRD (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement)BondyFrance

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