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Overview of Thermal Ablation Devices: Microwave

  • Jeffrey A. Klein
  • Fred T. LeeJr.
  • J. Louis Hinshaw
  • Meghan G. Lubner
  • Chris L. Brace
Chapter
Part of the Techniques in Interventional Radiology book series (TECHRAD)

Abstract

Microwave ablation utilizes dielectric hysteresis to produce heat within tissue. Dielectric hysteresis occurs when polar molecules in tissue (primarily H 2 O) are forced to continuously realign with an applied, oscillating electromagnetic fi eld. The polar molecules will realign billions of times per second, thus increasing their kinetic energy and temperature by friction. Tissues with a high percentage of water (as in solid organs and tumors) are most conducive to this type of heating and readily absorb microwave energy. Tissue destruction, via coagulation, occurs when tissues are heated to a lethal temperature by the applied electromagnetic frequency of either 915 MHz or 2.45 GHz, which are the only ISM (industrial, scienti fi c, and medical) approved frequencies.

Keywords

Polar Molecule Ablation Zone Coaxial Cable Microwave Ablation Efficient Ablation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Suggested Reading

  1. Brace CL. Microwave ablation technology: what every user should know. Curr Probl Diagn Radiol. 2009a;38:61–7.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Brace CL. Radiofrequency and microwave ablation of the liver, lung, kidney, and bone: what are the differences? Curr Probl Diagn Radiol. 2009b;38:135–43.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Lubner MG, Brace CL, Hinshaw JL, Lee Jr FT. Microwave tumor ablation: mechanism of action, clinical results, and devices. J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2010;21:S192–203.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey A. Klein
    • 1
  • Fred T. LeeJr.
    • 1
  • J. Louis Hinshaw
    • 1
  • Meghan G. Lubner
    • 1
  • Chris L. Brace
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyUniversity of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health, E3/311 Clinical Science CenterMadisonUSA

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