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Husserl

  • Mark Kac
  • Gian-Carlo Rota
  • Jacob T. Schwartz
Part of the Modern Birkhäuser Classics book series

Abstract

The best philosophers of our century suffer from a com mon deficiency of expression. They seem bent upon making an already difficult message all but unintelligible by irritating mannerisms of style. For example, in Wittgenstein we meet a barrage of epigrammatic cryptography suited only for the Oxbridge market; in Heidegger truth is subordinated to alliteration and to a cunning desire to anger the reader by histrionic displays of German archaisms; Ortega would bury his finest insights in prefaces to his friends’ collections of Andalusian poems or in Sunday supplements of Argentine dailies, while feeding the grand public a dubious Kitsch calculated to keep himself financially afloat; Croce would use his pen to fly away from unpleasant Fascist reality into the anecdotes of the Kingdom of Naples of yore; Nicolai Hartmann was subject to attacks of graphomania; and so on, all the way to Sartre. Small wonder that the intellectual public, repelled by such antics, should fall into the arms of a demimonde of facile simplifiers and sweeping generalizers. The Russells, the Spenglers, the Toynbees, and their third-rate cohorts have lowered the understanding of philosophy to a level unseen since the seventh century.

Keywords

Intellectual Public Seventh Century Physiological Explanation Intellectual Dishonesty Facile Simplifier 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Kac
  • Gian-Carlo Rota
    • 1
  • Jacob T. Schwartz
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Mathematics and PhilosophyMITCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Courant InstituteNew YorkUSA

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