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Respect in the Context of Infant Male Circumcision

Can Ethics and Law Provide Insights?
  • Margaret A. Somerville

Abstract

As you are almost certainly aware, human cloning is a major scientific, ethical, and legal issue at present. In fact, it may well prove to be the major “science fiction turned science fact” event of the end of the twentieth century. What connection could the debate surrounding human cloning have with both the current practice of infant male circumcision and moves to abolish this? A slide that I prepared as part of a presentation I gave on the ethical issues raised by human cloning is relevant to responding to this question.

Keywords

Religious Belief Male Circumcision Female Genital Mutilation Religious Reason Conscientious Objection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers, New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret A. Somerville

There are no affiliations available

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