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Osteoporosis Risk Profile for Peri- and Postmenopausal Women Attending Menopause Clinics in Italy

  • M. Massobrio
  • R. Chionna
  • M. Ciammella
  • V. De Leo
  • G. De Luigi
  • M. Gallo
  • A. La Marca
  • R. Lombardo
  • M. Mauloni
  • U. Omodei
  • G. Sciacchitano
  • ICARUS Osteoporosis Study Subgroup
Part of the Medical Science Symposia Series book series (MSSS, volume 13)

Abstract

Bone mineral density (BMD) is the best predictor of osteoporotic fractures since each standard deviation decline is associated with a 2- or 3-fold increase in the risk of fracture, depending on the skeletal site evaluated. It would be of interest to look for relations between BMD and risk factors for osteoporosis (such as body mass index (BMI), menopausal status, menarcheal age). For example, in 1995 in a large epidemiological study of more than 9,000 women over 65, it was possible to see correlations between BMD and specific single factors, many of which could be ameliorated by prevention and treatment [1].

Keywords

Bone Mineral Density Menopausal Status Peak Bone Mass Vertebral Deformity Fertile Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers and Fondazione Giovanni Lorenzini 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Massobrio
  • R. Chionna
  • M. Ciammella
  • V. De Leo
  • G. De Luigi
  • M. Gallo
  • A. La Marca
  • R. Lombardo
  • M. Mauloni
  • U. Omodei
  • G. Sciacchitano
  • ICARUS Osteoporosis Study Subgroup

There are no affiliations available

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