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Pesticides: Historical Changes Demand Ethical Choices

  • John H. Perkins
  • Nordica C. Holochuck

Abstract

Controversy over pesticides and pest control is no stranger to American life. Since the 19th century, public concerns have periodically ricocheted around the use of pesticides and other means of pest control. Frequently the criticisms have asserted in a moral tone that the action in question was wrong in some fundamental fashion. Understanding the moral dimensions of the use of pesticides, however, requires an understanding of the context of pest control actions. This context is complex and consists of (1) modernization and its impacts, (2) changes in American agriculture after 1945, (3) the obligations of pest control experts as professionals, and (4) how entomology developed in the United States. We discuss each of these contextual areas before turning to an examination of major ethical issues involving insect control.

Keywords

Natural Enemy Pest Control Integrate Pest Management Environmental Ethic Boll Weevil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Routledge, Chapman & Hall, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • John H. Perkins
    • 1
  • Nordica C. Holochuck
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HistoryEvergreen State CollegeOlympia

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