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Stopping Dialysis Practice and Cultural, Religious and Legal Aspects

  • Carl M. Kjellstrand
  • Ronald Cranford
  • Michael Kaye

Abstract

Stopping dialysis, as a cause of death is common, particularly in North America. In the USA it is now the third most common cause of death in dialysis patients, and in Canada the second most common cause, after vascular deaths, as illustrated in Figure 1.

Keywords

Dialysis Patient Life Support Persistent Vegetative State Biomedical Ethic High Court 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl M. Kjellstrand
    • 1
  • Ronald Cranford
    • 2
  • Michael Kaye
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of Alberta HospitalEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Hennepin County Medical CentreMinneapolisUSA
  3. 3.Montreal General HospitalMontrealCanada

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