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Planning of Dialysis for Disasters

  • Kim Solez
  • Iraj Nadjafi
  • Ali-Reze Atef Zafarmand
  • Allan J. Collins

Abstract

Disasters requiring dialysis planning fall into two main categories: 1) disasters which interfere with treatment of pre-existing renal failure in developed countries by disrupting established dialysis services, and 2) disasters which cause substantial crush-injury-induced acute renal failure in underdeveloped countries which previously had limited or no dialysis facilities. The third potential category, crush-injury-induced acute renal failure in disasters in developed countries, is unusual owing to better standards of building construction in developed countries and better use of strategies which prevent acute renal failure (1). Even when it does occur the disruption of dialysis access for pre-existing renal failure patients is a greater problem. In the January 17, 1995 earthquake in Japan there were several hundred acute renal failure cases as a result of crush injury. However, well over 1,000 chronic renal failure patients had disruption of dialysis access (Dr Yoshihei Hirasawa, personal communication, 1995). The categories relating to domestic and foreign disasters are equally important, and the Public Education Committee of the US National Kidney Foundation has recently prepared a very instructive set of brochures dealing with planning for response to dialysis disruption in domestic disasters (2).

Keywords

Acute Renal Failure Host Country Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Disaster Response Crush Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kim Solez
    • 1
  • Iraj Nadjafi
    • 2
  • Ali-Reze Atef Zafarmand
    • 2
  • Allan J. Collins
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Laboratory Medicine 5B4.02 W. MacKenzie CenterUniversity of Alberta HospitalsEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Nephrology-Dialysis-Transplant Unit Dr Shariaty HospitalUniversity of TehranTehranIran
  3. 3.Regional Kidney Disease ProgramMinneapolisUSA

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