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Developing a Natural Language Interface to Complex Data

  • Gary G. Hendrix
  • Earl D. Sacerdoti
  • Daniel Sagalowicz
  • Jonathan Slocum
Chapter
Part of the Linguistica Computazionale book series (LICO, volume 9)

Abstract

Aspects of an intelligent interface that provides natural language access to a large body of data distributed over a computer network are described. The overall system architecture is presented, showing how a user is buffered from the actual database management systems (DBMSs) by three layers of insulating components. These layers operate in series to convert natural language queries into calls to DBMSs at remote sites. Attention is then focused on the first of the insulating components, the natural language system. A pragmatic approach to language access that has proved useful for building interfaces to databases is described and illustrated by examples. Special language features that increase system usability, such as spelling correction, processing of incomplete inputs, and run-time system personalization, are also discussed. The language system is contrasted with other work in applied natural language processing, and the system’s limitations are analyzed.

Keywords

Natural Language Noun Phrase Syntactic Category Syntax Tree Language Definition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary G. Hendrix
  • Earl D. Sacerdoti
  • Daniel Sagalowicz
  • Jonathan Slocum

There are no affiliations available

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