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Some Recent Trends In Natural Language Processing

  • Aravind K. Joshi
Chapter
Part of the Linguistica Computazionale book series (LICO, volume 9)

Abstract

In this paper, I will describe a few aspects of Natural Language Processing (NLP), specifically some recent trends. These topics concern some new avenues of research in grammars and parsing, and statistical approaches to NLP, a relatively new trend in NLP.

Keywords

Speech Recognition Noun Phrase Natural Language Processing Finite State Machine Derivation Tree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aravind K. Joshi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer and Information ScienceUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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