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Design Principles for Electronic Textual Resources: Investigating Users and Uses of Scholarly Information

  • Nicholas J. Belkin
Chapter
Part of the Linguistica Computazionale book series (LICO, volume 9)

Abstract

We describe a project whose goal is to develop a coherent set of principles for the design of electronic textual databases to support scholarly activity, in particular in the humanities. The focus of the project is a series of investigations which aim to understand: the tasks and goals of scholars in the humanities; the behaviors of such scholars in their interactions with texts of all types; the circumstances which lead them to engage in particular text-related behaviors; and their explicit uses of texts to accomplish their tasks and achieve their goals. We report here on the initial stages of our overall project, describing our methods and presenting preliminary results of a classification of scholarly tasks and goals, and of behaviors in interaction with texts and parts of texts, and also suggestions about the relationship between goals and information-seeking activities.

Keywords

Humanity Scholar Specific Text Scholarly Activity Loving Relationship Electronic Text 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicholas J. Belkin
    • 1
  1. 1.School of CommunicationInformation and Library Studies Rutgers UniversityUSA

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