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Visions of the Digital Library: Views on Using Computational Linguistics and Semantic Nets in Information Retrieval

  • Judith L. Klavans
Chapter
Part of the Linguistica Computazionale book series (LICO, volume 9)

Abstract

Whether there is arole for natural language processing techniques in information science has always been in question. Walker et al. 1977 report that the impact of linguistics, then a rapidly growing and vibrant field revolving around the study of language as a formal system, had surprisingly little impact on the field of information science, a field also revolving around the understanding of documents consisting largely of language. However, optimism and promise of results arising from collaborative efforts were also reported in Walker et al. 1977. In light of this optimism, this paper presents proposals for incorporating a semantic net derived semi-automatically from various machine-readable dictionaries into several aspects of the information retrieval task, including text indexing in order to cluster related documents, query expansion, and the the construction of a browser as part of the human interface.

Keywords

Information Retrieval Natural Language Processing Semantic Network Lexical Item Query Expansion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith L. Klavans
    • 1
  1. 1.Columbia UniversityUSA

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