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Machine Readable Dictionary as a Source of Grammatical Information

  • Eva Hajičová
  • Alexandr Rosen
Chapter
Part of the Linguistica Computazionale book series (LICO, volume 9)

Abstract

The present contribution describes an enterprise in collecting lexical data for an English parser in the context of a bilingual research project. The primary source of grammatical information is a computer usable version of OALD (Hornby, 1974). The target lexicon’s structure of verbal valency frames, inspired by the theoretical framework of functional generative description, includes an underlying level. Its content can be derived under some human supervision from OALD’s verb pattern codes. Results confirm the usefulness of machine readable dictionaries for NLP applications.

Keywords

Natural Language Processing Machine Translation Computational Linguistics Word Class Oxford English Dictionary 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eva Hajičová
    • 1
  • Alexandr Rosen
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Formal and Applied LinguisticsCharles UniversityPragueCzech Republic
  2. 2.Institute of Theoretical and Computational LinguisticsCharles UniversityPragueCzech Republic

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