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Holographic interferometry

  • J. R. Tyrer
  • J. C. Shelton

Abstract

The field of biomechanics is complex, incorporating a variety of structures such as bones, acted upon by ligaments, tendons and muscles. Analysis of these structures is important to understand their normal function in order to assess any changes that may occur due to disease or following surgery. The measurement of the displacements that occur upon loading these structures, using a non-contacting, full-field optical technique, not only allows the natural tissue to be used but also minimizes measurement artefacts. Holographic interferometry is one such measurement technique, which when applied carefully has many potential applications in biomechanics.

Keywords

Fringe Pattern Holographic Interferometry Intact Femur Object Beam Double Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. R. Tyrer
  • J. C. Shelton

There are no affiliations available

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