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Critical Creativity and Total Systems Intervention

  • Gillian Ragsdell

Abstract

If practitioners intend to make improvement to today’s organizations, then they must be equipped to tackle an enormous range of issues that inevitably they will encounter. The current turbulent environment brings a host of challenges. Not only are there “hard,” quantifiable issues to take into account, but there are also “soft,” qualitative issues to consider. Interaction between diverse issue areas, such as departmental priorities, new technology, and changing market forces, continually generates unique hard and soft constraints/opportunities for practitioners. Thus, as organizational life increases in these complexities, seldom, if ever, do problem contexts repeat themselves. Originality and novelty of thought are therefore essential qualities for successful management of organizational complexity. Creative thinking is an essential quality.

Keywords

Creative Process Creative Thinking Soft System Methodology Idealize Design Nominal Group Technique 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gillian Ragsdell
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Systems StudiesUniversity of HullHullEngland

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