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Dealing with Diversity

  • Wendy Gregory

Abstract

Interests within the systems community have turned during the last decade toward a consideration and an importation of ideas emanating from what might be termed “Continental” philosophers. I refer, of course, to interest in the work of Habermas and, to a lesser degree, of Foucault, Derrida, Lacan, and Lyotard (see, e.g., Cummings, 1994; Flood, 1989a Flood, 1989b Flood, 1989c, Flood, 1990a Flood, 1990b Flood, 1990c; Fuenmayor, 1985, Fuenmayor, 1990a, Fuenmayor, 1990b, Fuenmayor, 1991; Gregory, 1990, Gregory, 1992; Jackson, 1982, Jackson, 1983, Jackson, 1985a, Jackson, 1985b, Jackson, 1987a, Jackson, 1987b, Jackson, 1989, Jackson, 1990, Jackson, 1991a, Jackson, 1991b; Levy, 1991; Midgley, 1990, Midgley, 1991, Midgley, 1992a, Midgley, 1992b, Midgley, 1994; Mingers, 1980, Mingers, 1992; Oliga, 1988, Oliga, 1990a Oliga, 1990b Oliga, 1990c, Oliga, 1991; Payne, 1992; Ulrich, 1983, Ulrich, 1988; Valero-Silva, 1994, Valero-Silva, 1995a, Valero-Silva, 1995b, this volume; Wooliston, 1990, Wooliston, 1991a,Wooliston, 1991b—other contributors are listed by Oliga, 1988, Oliga, 1991). The main questions for contemporary systems practitioners, especially those whose field of intervention is organizations and communities, have emerged from the sheer range of approaches that are available for responding to problems, problematics, messes, or problem situations.

Keywords

Force Field Critical System System Thinking System Methodology System Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wendy Gregory
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Systems StudiesUniversity of HullHullEngland

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