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Reflections on an Action Research Project

Women and the Law in Southern Africa
  • Norma R. A. Romm

Abstract

In this chapter, a discussion of a particular action research project is undertaken, the purpose being to draw out features of its relevance for Critical Systems Thinking (CST). The research was concerned with investigating maintenance and inheritance laws and practices in a number of southern African countries. The project on inheritance constituted the second phase of the research (the first being concerned with maintenance law). My particular involvement was as a so-called (temporary) consultant/facilitator to the team of seven researchers in Swaziland, the aim being to facilitate coordination of the research practices being employed there in this second phase. (My sister Nina Romm shared the “consultancy” role.)

Keywords

Research Process Participatory Action Research Soft System Methodology Action Research Project Viable System Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norma R. A. Romm
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Systems StudiesUniversity of HullHullEngland

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