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Unions, Employers, and Labor Market Developments

Abstract

All relationships in Indonesia, interpersonal and institutional, are guided by the national ideology of Pancasila, which as we have seen emphasizes harmony, mutual self-help, and consensus decision making. Pancasila also theoretically applies to industrial relations in that government, labor, and management are expected to work cooperatively to achieve overall national development goals, including the establishment of social justice and an equitable apportionment of the fruits of economic progress.

Keywords

Labor Force Minimum Wage Collective Bargaining Informal Sector Industrial Relation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1997

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