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Abstract

As described in preceding chapters, there is no shortage of labor issues for labor activists or independent unions to pursue in mainland China. In this, the concluding chapter in Part II, we will describe the primary areas of concern involving worker rights and labor standards which have developed as China has experienced close to two decades of economic and labor reform efforts.

Keywords

Minimum Wage Trade Union Foreign Firm Child Labor State Enterprise 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1997

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