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The Political and Economic Background

Abstract

Political and economic decisions are inextricably intertwined in most nations, and China is no exception to this general rule. We will now examine significant political and economic developments since the prodemocracy movement was crushed in 1989, in order to determine their actual and potential impact on the labor scene.

Keywords

Communist Party State Council State Enterprise Special Economic Zone National People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1997

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