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Abstract

In the preceding chapter we discussed the Malaysian government’s encouragement of in-house unions. This policy is an example of a union regulatory system aimed at reducing whatever bargaining power workers may have with management. The in-house or enterprise union model is currently the norm in the electronics industry, one of the problem areas examined in this chapter, along with the plight of plantation workers, the flexi-wage proposal linking pay with productivity, the new remuneration system of compensation for public sector employees, and problems created by the large influx of foreign workers.

Keywords

Foreign Worker Labor Shortage National Union Wage Rigidity Plantation Worker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1997

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