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Abstract

In Thailand labor rights and relations are governed primarily by the Labor Relations Act of 1975. Not included under the purview of the Act are agricultural workers, civil servants, and employees of state enterprises. A separate statute, the State Enterprise Labor Relations Act (SELRA), passed in 1991, governs labor in the state firms.

Keywords

Minimum Wage Labor Relation State Enterprise Labor Dispute Grievance Procedure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1997

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