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Abstract

Thailand has seen at least 22 military coups or coup attempts since absolute monarchy ended in 1932. However, in the July 2, 1995 election, for the first time in many years there was no military intervention and the voting took place against the backdrop of a booming economy that has created an expanding urban middle class. While the population is still predominantly rural, where political life is dominated by money and patronage, urban voters are demanding competent managers who can find solutions to such problems as Bangkok’s nightmarish traffic.1

Keywords

Minimum Wage Prime Minister Child Labor Industrial Relation Democrat Party 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1997

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