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Influences of Genetic Testing on A Person’s Freedom

  • Elisabeth Hildt

Abstract

Automony and freedom of action are important characteristics of personhood which are of relevance in almost all areas of human existence. Also in the context of medical ethics the concepts of autonomy, freedom of action, and freedom of choice, which are all tightly linked to one another, play an important role. The concept of freedom can be interpreted in a wide sense so that it encompasses freedom of the will and freedom of choice, but also, more generally speaking, rationality, self-consciousness and intentionality. Also restricted room for manoeuvring, i.e. a limited capacity to make decisions and plans materialise, can be considered a reduction in a person’s freedom.

Keywords

Genetic Testing Future Life Genetic Knowledge Predictive Genetic Testing Asymptomatic Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elisabeth Hildt
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Ethics in the Sciences and HumanitiesUniversity of TubingenTubingen

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