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Predicting Behavior of Phyllosphere Bacteria in the Growth Chamber from Field Studies

  • Christen D. Upper
  • Susan S. Hirano

Abstract

Greenhouse and growth chamber have served the plant sciences well. Use of a controlled environment facilitates experimental manipulation, diminishes environmental variability and provides the means to separate variables and test hypotheses. Such fundamental studies as those that led to the discovery and/or elucidation of mechanisms of phenomena such as photoperiodism, phototropism, photosynthesis, phytohormones and many others were greatly facilitated by use of controlled environmental facilities. The eminent success of such an approach for many aspects of plant-microbe interactions is well documented. For example, screening for resistance to a number of diseases has been successfully conducted in controlled environments for decades.

Keywords

Growth Chamber Bean Plant Brown Spot Bean Leave Wild Type Parent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christen D. Upper
    • 1
    • 2
  • Susan S. Hirano
    • 2
  1. 1.U.S. Department of AgricultureAgricultural Research ServiceUSA
  2. 2.Department of Plant PathologyUniversity of WisconsinMadison

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