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Inter-Representation Networks and Cognitive Maps

  • Juval Portugali
Part of the GeoJournal Library book series (GEJL, volume 32)

Abstract

The notion of Inter-Representation Networks (IRN) suggests that the cognitive system in general, and the one associated with cognitive maps in particular, extend beyond the individual’s mind/brain into the external environment. Accordingly, the cognitive system is perceived as composed of elements in the mind/brain, internally representing the external environment, and elements in the environment, externally representing the mind. The dynamics of cognitive processes and the construction of cognitive maps is interpreted as a complex interaction between these internal and external representations. While this view somewhat departs from main-stream cognitive science, it was always present in its discourse in the writings of scholars such as Vygotsky, Gibson, Bartlett, and more recently Rumelhart Smolansky and Hinton, Alexander, Lakoff, and Edelman. The main body of the paper discusses the IRN element in the writings of these authors and by doing so develops and elaborates the various facets and potentialities of IRN and their role in the construction of cognitive maps.

Keywords

Cognitive System External Memory External Representation Pattern Language Holographic Record 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juval Portugali
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeographyTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael

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