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Cognitive Mapping and Wayfinding by Adults Without Vision

  • Reginald G. Golledge
  • Roberta L. Klatzky
  • Jack M. Loomis
Part of the GeoJournal Library book series (GEJL, volume 32)

Abstract

In this chapter we focus on processes that underlie successful wayfinding by those traveling without the help of vision. Particular emphasis is placed on how travelers develop and use cognitive maps. We discuss both the cognitive mapping process and wayfinding, emphasizing the skills that have to be developed with and without the aid of assistive technology. Both experimental and real world examples are used to illustrate the skills, abilities, and processes needed for successful travel without vision. Throughout, our emphasis is on wayfinding by adult populations.

Keywords

Mental Rotation Path Integration Spatial Ability Blind Subject Sighted Subject 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reginald G. Golledge
    • 1
  • Roberta L. Klatzky
    • 2
  • Jack M. Loomis
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Geography and Research Unit in Spatial Cognition and ChoiceUniversity of California Santa BarbaraSanta Barbara
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCarnegie-Mellon UniversityPittsburgh
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of California Santa BarbaraSanta Barbara

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