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Retrieving Canopy Properties from Remote Sensing Measurements

  • Michel M. Verstraete
Part of the Eurocourses: Remote Sensing book series (EURS, volume 4)

Abstract

A wide variety of tools have been designed to extract information on the nature and structure of terrestrial ecosystems from remote sensing data. Two approaches are described here in some detail: the use of spectral indices, and the design and inversion of physically-based models of the interaction between the radiation field and the surface. The advantages and drawbacks of these approaches are discussed, and the importance of combined field and laboratory measurement campaigns is stressed.

Keywords

Normalize Difference Vegetation Index Remote Sensing Spectral Band Vegetation Index Spectral Index 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ECSC, EEC, EAEC, Brussels and Luxembourg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michel M. Verstraete
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Remote Sensing ApplicationsCommission of the European Communities Joint Research CentreIspra (Va)Italy

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