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IRIS Pigment Epithelial Cell Transplantation in Monkey Eyes

  • Toshiaki Abe
  • Hiroshi Tomita
  • Toshifumi Ohashi
  • Katsura Yamada
  • Yoshiyuki Takeda
  • Keiko Akaishi
  • Madoka Yoshida
  • Makoto Tamai

Abstract

To establish auto iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cell transplantation, we examined monkey IPE and performed auto IPE transplantation. IPE cells of the monkeys were obtained by peripheral iridectomy and cultured as we previously reported. Immunocytochemical study was also performed to confirm that they were epithelial in origin. Cultured condition were also studied with bovine, rabbit, mouse, auto, or human serum. Transplantation study was performed by transvitreal approach in the monkey eyes. Mouse and rabbit serums were extremely toxic to the monkey IPE cell culture. Conversely, the cells grew well in the medium with bovine, monkey, and human serum. The difference was not statistically significant among bovine, monkey, and human serum. We demonstrated the presence of the transplanted cultured IPE cells after 60 days of transplantation by ophthalmoscopical and histochemical examination. Several reports also have demonstrated that IPE cells may have about 80% phagocytic function and may also be able to form tight junctions in the subretinal space. The establishment of auto IPE cell transplantation may improve the problem of the rejection.

Keywords

Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cystoid Macular Edema Subretinal Space Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Iris Pigment Epithelium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshiaki Abe
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Tomita
    • 1
  • Toshifumi Ohashi
    • 1
  • Katsura Yamada
    • 1
  • Yoshiyuki Takeda
    • 1
  • Keiko Akaishi
    • 1
  • Madoka Yoshida
    • 1
  • Makoto Tamai
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyTohoku University School of MedicineSendaiJapan

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