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Response Characteristics of Subretinal Microphotodiode-Based Implant-Mediated Cortical Potentials

  • Neal S. Peachey
  • Alan Y. Chow
  • Machelle T. Pardue
  • Jay I. Perlman
  • Vincent Y. Chow

Abstract

Presently, there is no treatment by which to restore vision to patients blinded by outer retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. We have developed a retinal prosthetic that is designed to be placed in the sub-retinal space and thereby stimulate second-order retinal neurons spared by disorders that induce selective photoreceptor degeneration. The device is semiconductor-based and does not require an external power supply for operation. Previous studies have characterized the device with respect to biocompatibility and function. The present study concerns cortical potentials elicited when the implant is stimulated with infrared light, to which the native retina is insensitive. The results indicate that these potentials share several response characteristics with conventional visual evoked potentials and support the conclusion that the implant is capable of electrically activating the visual system.

Keywords

Retinitis Pigmentosa Visual Evoke Potential Electrode Position Cortical Response Bonding Layer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Neal S. Peachey
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alan Y. Chow
    • 3
    • 4
  • Machelle T. Pardue
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jay I. Perlman
    • 2
    • 5
  • Vincent Y. Chow
    • 3
  1. 1.Research Service (151)Hines VA HospitalHines
  2. 2.Stritch School of MedicineLoyola University ChicagoMaywood
  3. 3.Optobionics CorporationWheaton
  4. 4.Louisiana State University Eye CenterNew Orleans
  5. 5.Ophthalmology Section Surgical ServiceHines VA Hospital Hines

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