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Blue Cone Monochromacy

Macular Degeneration in Individuals with Cone Specific Gene Loss
  • Radha Ayyagari
  • Laura E. Kakuk
  • Yumiko Toda
  • Caraline L. Coats
  • Eve L. Bingham
  • Janet J. Szczesny
  • Joost Felius
  • Paul A. Sieving

Abstract

Blue cone monochromacy (BCM) is an X-linked ocular disorder in which affected males have normal short-wavelength-sensitive (blue) cone and rod function but lack medium-(green) and long-wavelength-sensitive (red) cone function. Affected males characteristically have visual acuities of 20/100 to 20/200, myopia, nystagmus, and minimal foveal granularity with otherwise normal fundus findings.1

Keywords

Green Gene Locus Control Region Pigment Gene Blue Cone Macular Atrophy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Radha Ayyagari
    • 1
  • Laura E. Kakuk
    • 1
  • Yumiko Toda
    • 1
  • Caraline L. Coats
    • 1
  • Eve L. Bingham
    • 1
  • Janet J. Szczesny
    • 1
  • Joost Felius
    • 1
  • Paul A. Sieving
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Ophthalmology W.K. Kellogg Eye CenterUniversity of MichiganAnn Arbor

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