Advertisement

Grading Device for Light Perception with Retinitis Pigmentosa

  • Makoto Tamai
  • Hiroshi Kunikata
  • Masahiro Tsunoda

Abstract

Purpose: The goal of this study is to innovate a device for grading very low visual function expressed as light perception in patients such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and makes it possible to evaluate effects for various therapeutic modalities or their changes following the progress of the disease.

Methods: The device was composed of a pair of goggles with a white light emission diode, 5 mm in diameter, an earphone for each ear, a control cabinet which emits light and a clicking stimuli, a hand-held grip with a button, and a recorder for calculating correct answer for stimuli. The light intensity and duration were changed in three levels, 10cd/m2(C), 100C, 1000C, and its duration, 0.1second(S), 0.3S, 1S independently. As a result, they were graded into nine different levels of intensities and delivered in a random sequence after a click sound of 0.7 sec prior to the stimulation. Patients were asked to push a button when they recognized these stimuli. Each eye was separately stimulated 5 times in each intensity and duration, 45 times per eye, therefore, a total of 90 times. Ten RP patients with light perception were examined and their visual ability was graded. The FP was examined before and after cataract extraction, stellate ganglion block and lipo-prostaglandin El was administered in two cases with RP and we studied the possibility of differentiating their functions and also reproducibility with this device.

Results: We could differentiate changes of LP with this device and observe changes of very low grade vision with treatment.

Conclusion: This device is valuable for evaluating low visual function such as LP of RP patients. It will be valuable for following their vision and also discriminating very small changes of visual function with medical and surgical treatment in the future.

Keywords

Visual Function Retinitis Pigmentosa Hyperbaric Oxygen Error Score Light Perception 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Duke-Elder, Sir S. The examination of the visual functions, pp. 366–380. Chapter XIV The foundations of ophthalmology, System of Ophthalmology Vol. VII Henry Kimpton, London, 1962.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Jacobson S.G., Walter J.V. et al. Automated lightand dark-adapted perimetery for evaluating retinitis pigmentosa. Ophthalmology, 93:1604–1611, 1986.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 4.
    Horiguchi M, Miyaké Y., Tomita N., and Suzuki S. A therapeutic trial of intraveous lipoprostaglandine El (Lipo-PGE1) for type 2 (Massof) retinitis pigmentosa. Report of Research Committee on Chorioretinal Degenerations, The Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan, 130–131, 1994.Google Scholar
  4. 5.
    Atsumi K., Ogino N., and Honda Y. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for retinitis pigmentosa. Report of Research Committee on Chorioretinal Degenerations, The Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan, 215–218, 1992.Google Scholar
  5. 6.
    Shiono T., Miura T., Chida Y., Nakazawa M., and Tamai M. Is hyperbaric oxygen effective on retinitis pigmentosa? Report of Research Committee on Chorioretinal Degenerations, The Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan, 203–204, 1993.Google Scholar
  6. 7.
    Ooba N., Isashiki Y., Uto M., Adachi E. et al. Systemic administration of idebenon to patients with retinitis pigmentosa-A multicenter study. Report of Research Committee on Chorioretinal Degenerations, The Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan. 225–227, 1992.Google Scholar
  7. 8.
    Berson E.L., Rosner B. et al. A randamized trial of vitamin A and vitamin E supplementation for retinitis pigmentosa. Arch Ophthalmol., 111:761–772, 1993.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Makoto Tamai
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Kunikata
    • 1
  • Masahiro Tsunoda
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Ophthalmology TohokuUniversity School of MedicineSendaiJapan

Personalised recommendations