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Teaching Informatics in the Bulgarian Schools

  • Petia Assenova
  • Rumen Nikolov
  • Ivan Stanchev
  • Jorjeta Koleva
Part of the Technology-Based Education Series book series (TBES, volume 1)

Abstract

The Bulgarian education system is in the process of decentralizing and shifting decision-making power from the government towards the local educational councils and authorities, school principals, and teachers. The state funds the education system by allocating resources from the budget of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, local counties, and some other state organizations that are responsible for running special schools. In Bulgaria, the approach of teaching informatics in separate courses is widely applied. But experiments in integrating informatics across the curriculum are also being conducted, and a number of new projects in computer education have recently been initiated. Empirical studies show that despite the positive experiences and valuable research that have resulted from some interesting projects and initiatives, Bulgarian schools face a number of severe problems in computer education. The primary reason for that is economic.

Keywords

Education System Teacher Training School Subject Educational Software Teaching Informatics 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Petia Assenova
  • Rumen Nikolov
  • Ivan Stanchev
  • Jorjeta Koleva

There are no affiliations available

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