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Policies and Practice in the Belgium French Community with Respect to Computers in Education

  • Elise Boxus
  • Dieudonne Leclercq
  • Charles Duchateau
Part of the Technology-Based Education Series book series (TBES, volume 1)

Abstract

The education authorities in the Belgium French Community have been cautious to avoid waste and wary of prematurely rushing the diffusion of the new information technologies. However, many initiatives have been taken at local levels with recommendations and support from centralized levels. Three types of organizing authorities oversee the educational system of the French Community. The structure of the system and the more general developments in the educational uses of computers are described first. Policy and practices under the specific organizing authorities are then reviewed in turn. All discussion refers only to the period up until 1994.

Keywords

Secondary Education Secondary Level Community School Catholic School Education Authority 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elise Boxus
  • Dieudonne Leclercq
  • Charles Duchateau

There are no affiliations available

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