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Educational Paradigms and Models of Computer Use does Technology Change Educational Practice?

  • Georgia Kontogiannopoulou-Polydorides
Part of the Technology-Based Education Series book series (TBES, volume 1)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to discuss issues related to the emerging modes of computer use across countries having distinct and varied educational paradigms. The term educational paradigm is used in the chapter’s context to denote similar orientation with respect to educational discourse and practice. The characteristics which lie in the core of what is named as educational paradigm are curriculum content, teachers discourse and teaching practices, and decision making processes. The underlying assumption is that the educational paradigm has a very decisive role in the mode of computer use in the respective educational system. More specifically, it is assumed that the adoption of educational technology is shaped by and shapes the educational paradigm.

Keywords

Educational Technology Educational System Prospective Teacher Educational Practice School Subject 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Georgia Kontogiannopoulou-Polydorides

There are no affiliations available

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