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The United States Context of Computers in Education

  • Ronald E. Anderson
Part of the Technology-Based Education Series book series (TBES, volume 1)

Abstract

The educational system in the United States has traditionally operated on the basis of decentralized decision-making processes and diverse philosophies and practices. No national curriculum currently exists for any subject, let alone the relatively newborn subject of computer education. Nevertheless, national movements do emerge out of wide and long-standing concerns over improving educational outcomes for all U.S. students and the research and debates that accompany that goal. America began to bring computers into the schools relatively early, one consequence of which is a relatively large standing inventory of more outdated equipment alongside the recent acquisitions of newer technologies such as CD-ROMS and videodiscs. Today, “technology integration” is the ascending curricular model for computer education, wherein the teachers of several non-computer subjects together share the responsibility for teaching basic computing skills to students. Investigations into the effectiveness of different models and into training methods that would improve teachers’ abilities to keep pace with the rapidly changing technology are sorely needed.

Keywords

Technology Integration Computer Literacy American School American Education Computer Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald E. Anderson

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