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New Information Technology in Schools in the United Kingdom

  • Ceris Bergen
Part of the Technology-Based Education Series book series (TBES, volume 1)

Abstract

In recent years, England and Wales and, to some extent, Northern Ireland, have adopted the approach of a national curriculum while in Scotland, much of the curricular decision-making remains centered at the local level. Britain began major programs to support microelectronics education in 1980 and has become a leader in some educational uses of information technology. The average pupil-to-micro computer ratio in secondary schools in 1992 is about 18 to 1.

Keywords

Educational Technology National Curriculum Inservice Training Education Authority Attainment Target 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ceris Bergen

There are no affiliations available

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