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Computers in Education: The Indian Context

  • Ashok K. Sharma
  • Satvir Singh
Part of the Technology-Based Education Series book series (TBES, volume 1)

Abstract

The national system of education in India employs a curricular framework with a common core and other flexible components. It intends to provide access and quality of education to all. The administrative and financial controls of the system rest jointly with the union government and the state-level governments. In 1984, a program of computer literacy was started on an experimental basis in government schools. The first computer-related policy, emphasizing computer literacy, was established as a part of the National Policy on Education in 1986 and modified in 1992. Realizing all of India’s intended policy goals regarding the use of computers in education will require facing several major obstacles. This paper makes suggestions for overcoming some of them.

Keywords

Teacher Training Human Resource Development Computer Literacy INDIAN Context Computer Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ashok K. Sharma
  • Satvir Singh

There are no affiliations available

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