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The Transition from Temporary to Permanent Disability: Evidence from New York State

  • Terry Thomason
Part of the Huebner International Series on Risk, Insurance and Economic Security book series (HSRI, volume 16)

Abstract

Workers’ compensation is a social insurance program providing cash benefits, medical care, and rehabilitation services to workers disabled by work-related injuries or diseases. Workers’ compensation is one of the largest social programs in the United States. In 1984 almost 82 million workers were covered by workers’ compensation programs, which paid over 19 billion dollars in benefits (Nelson, 1988). In terms of benefits paid, workers’ compensation is larger than the Social Security Disability Income program, which paid approximately 18 billion dollars in benefits in 1984, and the several state and federal unemployment insurance programs, which paid about 15 billion in benefits that same year (Nelson, 1988).

Keywords

Injured Worker Disability Benefit Permanent Disability Benefit Level Compensation Insurance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terry Thomason

There are no affiliations available

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