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The Impact of Experience-Rating on Employer Behavior: The Case of Washington State

  • James Chelius
  • Robert S. Smith
Part of the Huebner International Series on Risk, Insurance and Economic Security book series (HSRI, volume 16)

Abstract

One of the purposes of the workers’ compensation system is to influence the level of injuries and illnesses at the workplace. While this is an important goal within the context of this program, it takes a broader social significance since the other major program for influencing workplace safety and health, the Occupational Safety And Health Act, has been widely acknowledged as unsuccessful (McCaffrey, 1983). Despite the critical nature of the issue, there has been a relatively small amount of empirical work on this subject.

Keywords

Small Firm Injury Rate Insurance Premium Expected Loss Employer Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Chelius
  • Robert S. Smith

There are no affiliations available

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