Advertisement

Recombinant Dna Technology in The Bovine Diseases Control Program and Development of Cattle Industry

  • Chariya Brockelman
  • Vichai Boonsaeng
  • Peerapan Tan-ariya

Abstract

For effective control of the vector-borne bovine diseases, a thorough knowledge of the nature of the infective agents, the vectorial capability, and the susceptibility of the bovine host is required. There is, however, little information on prevalence and transmission of bovine diseases due to the difficulty of identifying infected animals by conventional microscopic examination. Therefore, we have used the novel technology of diagnostic DNA-probes for detection of Babesia infection. The best probe can detect as little as 25 ng of purified Babesia DNA, the equivalent of 0.001% parasitemia. Each of the developed probes are species specific. Research on development of vaccines against other tick-borne diseases is also being pursued. The strategy is to identify surface proteins relevant to protection, clone them, and express gene coding for these proteins and test their effectiveness as protective immunogens in recombinant vaccinia construct.

Keywords

Parasite Density Bovine Leukemia Virus Infected Blood Merozoite Surface Protein Cattle Industry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aranyaganond, P. et al 1978. Piroplasmosis vaccine. J. Thai Vet. Med. Assoc 29: 111–118.Google Scholar
  2. Barker, R.H. 1990. DNA Probe diagnosis of parasitic infections. Exptl. Parasitol. 70: 494–499.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Brockelman, C.R. 1989. Prevalence and impact of anaplasmosis and babesiosis in Asia. Thai J. Trop. Med. Parasitol. 12: 31–36.Google Scholar
  4. Brockelman, C.R. and Tan-ariya P. 1991. Development of an in vitro microtest to assess drug susceptibility of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina. J. Parasitol. 77: 994–997PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Burridge, M.J. 1990. Improved control of anaplasmosis and babesiosis through biotechnology. Proc. 7th FAVA Congress, Pattaya.Google Scholar
  6. Goff, W. et al. 1988. Detection of Anaplasma marginale-intected tick vectors by using a cloned JNA probe. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (USA)85: 919–923.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Hines, S.A. et al. 1989. Molecular characterization of Babesia bovis merozoite surface proteins bearing epitopes immunodorminant in protected cattle. Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 37: 1–9.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. McElwain, T.F. et al. 1987. Antibodies define multiple proteins with epitopes exposed on the surface of live Babesia bigemina merozoites. J. Immunol. 138: 2298–2302.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Petpoo, W. 1990. Development of specific DNA probe to detect Babesia bovis infection in cattle. M. Sc. Thesis Mahidol University 125 pp.Google Scholar
  10. Rigby, P.W.J. et al. 1977. Labelling DNA to high specific activity in vitro by nick translation with DNA polymerase I. J. Mol. Biol. 113: 237–251.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Uilenberg, G. 1983. Epizootiology of tick-borne diseases. FAO Animal Production and Health paper. Series 36: 12–19.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chariya Brockelman
    • 1
  • Vichai Boonsaeng
    • 1
  • Peerapan Tan-ariya
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and Department of Biochemistry Faculty of ScienceMahidol UniversityBangkok

Personalised recommendations