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Genetic Analysis of Bacterial Strains Freshly Isolated from Natural Sources

  • W. Holloway
  • A. Bowen
  • S. Dharmsthiti
  • V. Krlshnapillal
  • A. Morgan
  • E. Ratnaningsih
  • M. I. Sinclair

Conclusions

The increased availability and a variety of recombinant DNA techniques, has provided a route for the genetic analysis of newly isolated bacteria. The data so obtained is essential if the manipulation of metabolic pathways of these strains is to be successful.

Three general conclusions are possible. Using genetically well characterized models, effective procedures for the genetic analysis of newly isolated bacteria can be developed. Next, a combination of physical and genetic techniques provides genetic analysis superior to the more traditional procedures. Finally, improved techniques enables whole genome analysis to be applied to a range of organisms. The unveiling of hidden complexities in the manner in which bacteria store their biological information can only contribute to our ability to manipulate them for practical purposes.

Keywords

Surrogate Host Rhodobacter Sphaeroides Wide Host Range Cosmid Clone Celgene Corporation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Holloway
    • 1
  • A. Bowen
    • 1
  • S. Dharmsthiti
    • 1
  • V. Krlshnapillal
    • 1
  • A. Morgan
    • 1
  • E. Ratnaningsih
    • 1
  • M. I. Sinclair
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Genetics and DevelopmentalBiology Monash UniversityClaytonAustralia

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